Advice To My Youngest On Turning 13

Dearest Cayley,

Photos for Blog

I can never say I Love You enough nor will I stop 😉 It’s crazy you are now thirteen. What would I be doing once your sisters left home if you had not come along? How blessed I am to be given a second chance at mothering. In some ways I have grown and often times I feel green.  You are very unique and so different from your sisters.  A decade later I have found that technology has changed the parenting dilemma.  Regardless, I know God choose to bless us with you for such a time as this.  Together we sharpen one another. So I complied 10 thoughts I desire for you to remember as you continue your life journey.

P1100845

1) Never forget you are fearfully and wonderfully made, yes made in the imagine of Christ who delights over you as He is a masterful creator.   (Psalm 139:13-16 http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=vardenafil-originale-Toscana Ephesians 2:10 ) Comparison is the joy killer of being content with your many beautiful features. Never allow the media or others to dictate what true beauty should look like.

Baptism Cayley and Riley's 54

2) Love the Lord with all your heart and get into the habit of beginning your days by putting Him first. You will often feel that there isn’t enough time in the day to get everything done. Time is something we all treasure, something we wish we had more of, but it just seems to slip so quickly through our fingers. We think if only I had more time I would spend it praying or reading the Bible, helping people, or making a difference.  (Proverbs 16:3; Luke 4:42, Matthew 14:13)  The poem The Difference is a good reminder of keeping God first.

Photos for Blog

3) Remember to love and listen to your sisters as they are two of the wisest women I know.  Support one another. Talk to one another regularly by being the initiator as you have more free time. Be there when they need you and they’ll be there for you. They really do love you that is why they both flew in to surprise you for your 13th birthday. Sisters are forever friends.P1050675

4) Be bold, take chances as those who don’t take chances don’t make advances. Dream big because you serve a BIG God. Strive to reach the full potential of your calling in life. (Jeremiah 29:11).   Don’t let anyone think less of you because you are young. Be an example to everyone through your speech,  by the way you live your life, in your authentic love, your faith, and your purity. (1 Timothy 4:12)

P1040446

5) Continue to travel while you are young. We hope that through our various family excursions we have given you a love for adventure, exposed you to various cultures, taken you out of your comfort zone, and shown you how big and yet small the world is. May you bring the good news to those wherever you go in the future. Isaiah 52:7; Romans 10:15

IMG_2795

6) Enjoy life! Gather often with your friends, have fun, laugh a lot and enjoy the relationships God has given you. Also your best friends will be those who bring out the best in you. Never substitute face-to-face interaction with that of the internet or social media. According to a study, people are happier and laugh 50% more when talking face-to-face with friends or via webcam than when they use social networking sites.

IMG_2253

Cari, Cayley, & Laurena

7) Cherish your human connections with friends and mentors who invest deeply into your life and you will grow wiser and richer.  Appreciate and remember those who have poured richly into your life (your sisters, grandparents, teachers, Sarah T. Danielle A., Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Teresa, Ritz, Mrs. Cheryl D., Grandma Coleen). Allow them to speak truth into your life so you can learn something new. Proverbs 13:20

IMG_1760

8) We love you unconditionally, always, and forever. No one will ever love you like your dad and I love you.

Read More

Read More

9) Be humble, teachable, and enjoy the learning process. Be a lover of learning as you gain the education needed to carry out the tasks for which God has designed you.  (Proverbs 9:9; 12:15; 11:14; 19:20-21; 15:22; Psalm 1:1-5).

Some of my greatest lessons have been learned through the pages of books. I have gained incredible insight, knowledge, and experience of various authors.  Reading exposes you to a world of imagination, showing you nothing is impossible.

“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.” Charles William Eliot

IMG_2833

10) Smile a lot and keep singing God’s praises. A smile draws others to you. The joy and love of the Lord are yours – so smile! Aim for joy found when putting cialis generico tadacip Jesus first, get link Others second, and http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=comprare-viagra-generico-200-mg-pagamento-online-a-Firenze Yourself last which creates true come comprare vardenafil 20 mg senza ricetta JOY. Being happy and enthusiastic is always a good choice and the joy of the Lord is your strength.   (Psalm 28:7; Nehemiah 8:10)

IMG_2841

In conclusion, do all things with Love. Love is so important to God that is is mentioned hundreds of times in the Bible. Love is referred to as the greatest commandment of all. Christ is love. John 13: 34-35 As we learn to love God’s way we provide the world with a tangible picture of Christ to the world.

I look forward to finishing the book Love As A Way of Life by Dr. Gary Chapman who writes, “Love is an attitude, that says, “I choose to focus my life on helping others.”  I appreciate those who use the following seven characteristics to define a loving person providing so much room to grow:

  • Kindness: Discovering the Joy of Helping Others
  • Patience: Accepting the Imperfections of Others
  • Forgiveness: Finding Freedom from the Grip of Anger. Life’s way too short to constantly be mad at someone.
  • Courtesy: Treating Others as Friends
  • Humility: Stepping Down So Someone Else Can Step Up
  • Generosity: Giving Yourself to Others
  • Honesty: Revealing Who You Really Are

IMG_1736 - Version 2

 

Modesty Is An Orientation of the Heart

HVAC

As a mother of three daughters I desire to instill in them both dignity and modesty.

My daughters grew up in an environment that valued modesty. As such, we did our best to show them how their attire and demeanor had a correlation with the way they would be treated by men. My husband monopolized teachable moments to point out “sexualization” in the media and discuss how some of the girls on magazine covers, and in movies, were revealing too much skin. As such, our daughters began to understand that wearing little clothing was like advertising their bodies.

http://acrossaday.com/?search=vardenafil-discounts modesty

7 Tips for teaching MODESTY to children

M Modesty first begins with you. Model virtue and beauty to your children and point out positive role models.

O Own it. Teach your children to walk with confidence and self-respect.

D Define standards for modesty early on and stick to these standards. It is important to be clear and consistent. If you haven’t set the tone early on, it will be harder to expect your teens to suddenly cover themselves up.

E Explain the reasons behind your decisions. As your children mature, dialogue with them about modesty and ask them what they think.

S Scrutinize clothing choices with your children as well as their media choices. Once again, it is helpful to maintain open communication with your children.

T Train your children to think about the reasons behind their choices. This is often accomplished through open dialogues, because it provides a safe outlet for your children to express their thoughts.

Y Your body is good. Modesty should never be about shaming the female body. We simply dress modestly because our bodies are God’s masterpieces. In fact, our bodies are a ‘temple of the Holy Spirit’.

here So how is a woman to dress?  In response to this question I wonder whether or not it is about the clothing, or lack there of, or if it is more about the heart attitude. We should be asking our daughters why they choose the outfits they do. Are they trying to bring attention and glory to themselves, or to God? Are they mimicking what others are wearing to fit in? It’s certainly okay to look nice and fashionable, but I believe that the posture of the heart is key. This can be accomplished by encouraging our children to cultivate a deep and meaningful relationship with Jesus. I encourage you to be active and interested in your children’s spiritual development.

1 Timothy 2:9 And I want women to be modest in their appearance. They should wear decent and appropriate clothing and not draw attention to themselves by the way they fix their hair or by wearing gold or pearls or expensive clothes.

1 Peter 3:3-4 (3) Don’t be concerned about the outward beauty of fancy hairstyles, expensive jewelry, or beautiful clothes. (4) You should clothe yourselves instead with the beauty that comes from within, the unfading beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is so precious to God. 

It is impossible to dress in a way that prevents other people from stumbling 100% of the time. This, however, is not the point. Modesty is not about wearing a burlap bag in an attempt to hide the female form and somehow prevent men from lusting.  source link Modesty is about valuing yourself. It is about learning to love how God made you as a woman and standing tall. It is about knowing how precious you are, every part of you, and not wanting or needing to flaunt it through less fabric on your body.  http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=acquistare-vardenafil-Liguria Modesty is not gauged by whether or not someone will easily be tempted to lust after you. It is poise, grace and a sense of value that naturally manifests itself through the attire that is chosen on a daily basis. Teach your daughters their value and instill in them an understanding of their strength.

Fathers, I encourage you to be present in your daughter’s lives and let them know how proud of them you are and how beautiful they are. Let them know that they are leaders and they have a powerful voice. This, in return, will have the greatest impact on what your child chooses to wear. You can teach them about modesty, and by all means please do, but  http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=comprare-viagra-generico-25-mg-pagamento-online-a-Venezia without captivating their heart they will see through the rules and have no problem wearing jackets before leaving the house in an effort to cover up their plunging necklines.

How do you handle modesty? I’d enjoy hearing from you.

Who Me, Patient?

Are we there yet?” This is the infamous cry coming from the backseat of any car filled with excited and, at times, impatient children.

1photo

Where might they have learned this trait? If we were to be honest with ourselves, I am sure we could easily recall moments of irritation and under the breath comments resulting from a delay in instant gratification. How quickly we show our annoyance when having to wait. We do not always practice patience and often do a poor job training our children this same virtue.

Living in a fast-paced society, people expect instant gratification. We like our food fast, our packages expedited, and our communication unlimited. Society is ruled by time versus having dominion over it like we were originally intended. There is no lack of time in the kingdom.

According to Webster, viagra generico italia pagamento online a Genova “patience is Buy Clomiphene 100mg accepting pains or hardships calmly or without complaint.”

Being patient means waiting without complaining. If I am busy complaining about the long lines, traffic, and the way others do things, then I am not demonstrating love. In recent post I have shared about my journey towards becoming a more loving person. It is my desire to understand what love looks like and to live from this place.

1 Corinthians 13:4 “LOVE is patient, love is kind.  It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.”

Ephesians 4:2 “Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in LOVE.”

Gary Chapman in his book, Love As A Way of Life, defines patience as “accepting the imperfections of others.”  We are all in the process of growing and maturing. Throughout this process, I often find it hardest to be patient with myself. Consequently, this results in less patience for others. I like what William Gurnall said, “Christ bears with the saints’ imperfections; well may the saints one with another.” To combat this I have been intentionally giving myself permission to be patient with myself. Surprisingly, as I have practiced patience, I have experienced greater peace and joy.

Five things I am intentionally practicing in order to become more patient:

  • I am choosing to be more patient with my imperfect self.
  • I’m learning to let little annoyances stay small.
  • I try to use words in a softer tone that are both uplifting and kind.
  • I remind myself that people are imperfect and in their own process. This helps me stress less.
  • I do my best to listen to people with a goal of understanding versus agreeing.

We love others to the same degree that we love ourselves. I held myself to such a high standard of excellence and performance that I wrongly sought the same in others. My self talk and negative thoughts were also a good indicator that I had little tolerance for my imperfections.  Condemning words such as: “I can’t believe you did that again. That was so dumb. You’re a total mess up. You call yourself a Christian?” As you can see, it is easy to become your own worst critic.

Instead of buying into the negative self-talk, it is beneficial to look at how far you have come and recognize the growth.  The more I intentionally do this, the less anger is able to rule my heart and the more I am able to see myself through the eyes of perfect love. This revelation spills over onto others and allows me to freely share the love that I have experienced.

Share some ways you practice being patient or share a story where being patient affected others or an outcome.